Lost Battalions
P.O. Box 478, Folsom, CA 95763-0478

E-mail us or call 916.221.2828

Telephone Service Hours
Monday - Friday
9:30AM-5:00 PM PST
(11:30-8:00 EST)
Weekends - CLOSED
IMPORTANT! Please read before placing an order.
Shipping & Handling Policies and Terms Of Purchase



Sales Policy and Terms

About us



Some of Our Product's Details

Proper Fieldblouse Length

Lost Batalions Resource Page for WWI and WWII Uniform information
Lost Battalions' Resource Page
This resource page gives useful information about WW2 German uniforms. Please click on the poster above.

Lost Battalions Measuring and Sizing Chart
(Please read this page before ordering any clothing. Both from LB and Schuster)
Visit
Proudly Made in the USA!

LIST IS INCOMPLETE AND PAGE IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION!

Glossary of Terminology

Have you ever wondered what kind of button hole you have in your field blouse? Or, have you ever wondered what the Germans called a piece of clothing during the war? Surprisingly, most reenactors and collectors don't know or have been told something incorrect! The reenactor and the collector needs to become aware that some terminology being used today is outright wrong and that some terms are inventions made by early collectors after the war to easly classify garments. In the end, none of these were ever used by the Germans during the war.

There are three goals that this glossary aims to achieve. First, to educate the reenactor or collector as to what the correct name or term is for what you buy or collect in World War Two German clothing. Second, to enlighten the reader with common textile terminology. Finaly, help the reenactor or collector know what the Germans called these items during the war. The last goal is the most important because knowing the proper German terminology allows the reader to properly translate into english what past and current authors and collectors have improperly labeled garments today.

The glossary is split into two sections: German uniform terminology and terminology commonly used in the textile industry. Both sections have English and German (as it was used during the war) teminology. The German uniform terminology section includes all terms regardless if it is correct, incorrect, or invented. This glossary's focus is on German garments and NOT field gear or equipment. So if it is not an article of clothing, it will not be listed.

Hopefully, this page will become a tool to enlighten the old, current, and future reenactor and collector.

GERMAN UNIFORM TERMINOLOGY (both English and German)

Easy Search
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A
Anzug, der [m.] (German): The proper German word for Suit.
Ärmelstrefen, der [m.] (German): The proper German word for Cuff Title. For a definition, see Cuff Title.
Abzeichen, das [n.] (German): The proper German word for Insignia. For a definition, see Insignia.

B
Belt Hook:
Bergmütze, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Mountain Cap. For a definition, see Mountain Cap.
BEVo (Bandfabric Ewald Vorsteher) Insignia:
Bluse, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Blouse. For a definition, see Blouse.
Boots:
Breast Eagle:
Breeches:

C
Cap Eagle:
Cape:
Cloak: Another word for Cape. For a definition, see Cape.
Coat:
Cockade:
Collar Tab: Is insignia that is placed on the collar of a jacket. This insignia can have a number of purposes. A few examples being to show rank (like SS collar tabs), show the branch of service (like coloring on the army tabs), show the unit an individual belongs to (like on early SS or SA tabs).
Crusher:
Cuff Title:

D
Dress Cap:
Dienstrock, der [m.] (German):
Drillichanzug, der [m.] (German): The proper German term for HBT Uniform. For a definition, see HBT Uniform.
Drillichbluse, die [f.] (German): The proper German term for HBT Jacket. For a definition, see HBT Jacket.
Drillichhosen, die [f.] (German): The proper German term for HBT Trousers. For a definition, see HBT Trousers.

E
Einheitsfeldmütze, die [f.] (German): "Einheits" really has no satisfying direct translation into English and is dependent on how the word is used, but in this particular usage "einheits" means "generic" or "universal". "Universal" would be the best match because the intent of the M43 cap design was for it to be used by all branches of service. In other words, universally use. So the translation is "universal field cap". Einheitsfieldmütze is the proper German word to descibe the M43 Cap. For a definition, see Universal Field Cap.
Einheitsfliegermütze, die [f.] (German): "Einheits" really has no satisfying direct translation into English and is dependent on how the word is used, but in this particular usage "einheits" means "generic" or "universal". "Universal" would be the best match because the intent of the M43 cap design was for it to be used by all branches of service. In other words, universally use. So the translation is "universal flying cap". Einheitsfliegermütze is the proper German word to descibe the Luftwaffe M43 Cap. For a definition, see Universal Flying Cap.
Embroidered Insignia:
Enlisted Ranks:

F
Farbe, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Color.
Feldbluse, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Field Blouse. For a definition, see Field Blouse.
Feldgraue Feldanzug, der [m.] (German): Literaly "field-gray field uniform" in German, it is used to descibe the Assault-gun Uniform. For a definition, see Assault-gun Uniform.
Feldmütze, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Field Cap. For a definition, see Field Cap.
Fliegerbluse, die [f.] (German):
Fliegermütze, die [f.] (German):
Field Blouse: Is the English translation of the German term "Feldbluse". It is simply any uniform jacket worn for field service. The US Army used the same term for many years, explaining to Civil War recruits that "your blouse is what you're wearing over your shirt and under your overcoat." For some strange reason, the troops thought a blouse was a woman's shirt. The US Army switched to the term "service coat" during or after WW1, but the term "blouse" is still used in military colleges and by some old-timers. The Marines may still use the term.The British Army used the term "blouse" for the jacket to their WW2 "Battle Dress" uniform, hence the commonly heard term "battle dress blouse". The US Army calls this a "jacket", hence the term "Ike Jacket" for the exact same piece of clothing.
Field Cap:
Fur-lined Boots:

G
Gaiters:
Gamaschen, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Gaiters. For a definition, see Gaiters.
Gloves:

H
Halsbinde, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Tie. For a definition, see Tie.
Handschuhe, die [pl.] (German): The proper German word for Gloves. For a definition, see Gloves.
HBT Jacket:
HBT Trousers:
HBT Uniform:
Heer, das [n.] (German): The proper German term for the Army.
Hemd, das [n.] (German): The proper German word for Shirt. For a definition, see Shirt.
Hoheitszeichen,das [n.] (German):
Hosen, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Pants or Trousers. For a definition, see Trousers.

I
Insignia:
Internal Suspenders:

J
Jacke, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Jacket. For a definition, see Jacket.
Jacket:

K
Keilhosen, die [f.] (German): (pronounced KYLE-hose-n not KEEL-hose-n)
Kokarde, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Cockade. For a definition, see Cockade.
Kragenbinde, die [f.] (German):
Kragenspiegel, der [m.] (German): The proper German term for Collar Tabs. For a definition, see Collar Tabs.
Krawatte, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Tie. The english word "cravat", the french "cravate", and the german "Krawatte" stems from "Crabate" or "Cravate" of croatian origin. The english word actually means a neckband; the forerunner of the modern tailored necktie and bow tie. Not "tie". The germans use this word to mean both "tie" and its traditional meaning "cravat". For a definition, see Tie.
Kriegsmarine, die [f.] (German): The proper German term for the Navy.

L
Lampassen:
Laufschuh, der [m.] (German): The proper German word for the Running Shoe.
Leather Coat:
Lederantel, der [m.] (German): The proper German word for Leather Coat. For a definition, see Leather Coat.
Lowboots:
Luftwaffe, die [f.] (German): The proper German term for the Air Force.

M

M-(year) Series Garments:
M-34 (Cap):
M-34 (Field Blouse):
M-36 (Field Blouse):
M-36/37 (Trousers):
M-37 (Field Blouse):
M-38 (Cap):
M-39 (Field Blouse):
M-40 (Cap):
M-40 (Field Blouse):
M-40 (Trousers):
M-41 (Field Blouse):
M-42 (Field Blouse):
M-42 (Trousers):
M-43 (Cap): For the M43 cap in general, see Universal Field Cap. For the Luftwaffe M43 cap, See Universal Flying Cap.
M-43 (Field Blouse):
M-43 (Trousers):
M-44 (Field Blouse):
Mannschaft, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Enlisted Ranks. For a definition, see Enlisted Ranks.
Mantel, der [m.] (German): The proper German word for Coat to be worn as an outer garment, not a jacket like for a suit. For a definition, see Coat.
Marching Boots:
Marchstiefel, die [pl.] (German): The proper German word for Marching Boots. For a definition, see Marching Boots.
Mountain Cap:
Mütze, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Cap or Hat.

N
Non-commissioned Officer (NCO) Ranks:

O
Officer Ranks:
Offizier, der [m.] (German): The proper German word for Officer. For a definition, see Officer Ranks.
Overcoat:

P
Panzerjacke, die [f.] (German):
Panzer Uniform:
Parka:
Peaked Cap:
Pelzstiefel, die [pl.] (German): The proper German word for the Fur-lined Boots. For a definition, see Fur-lined Boots.
Pip:

Q

R
Rain Coat:
Reed-green HBT Uniform: For a definition, see HBT Uniforrm.
Reithosen, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Riding Breeches. For a definition, see Riding Breeches.
Riding Breeches:
Rock, der [m.] (German): Originally meaning "jacket", "mantle" and "coat", an outer garment worn primarily by men. Today, "Rock" is used to describe "skirt". The word's origin is from the Old High German word "hroch". It is from this Old High German word that the english word "frock", as in "frock coat" originated from: hroch (Old High German) --> frok (middle english) --> frock (today). Many of the german jackets worn for special occasions include "Rock" in its name. For example: "Waffenrock", "Tuchrock", and "Dienstrock".
Rundbundhosen, die [f.] (German):

S
Schiffchen, das [n.] (German):
Schilfgrüne Drillichanzug, die [f.] (German): The proper German term for the Reed-green HBT Uniform. For a definition, see HBT Uniforrm.
Schirmmütze, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Dress Cap or Service Cap. For a definition, see Dress Cap.
Schnürschuh, der [m.] (German): The proper German word for Low Boots. For a definition, see Low Boots.
Schuhzeug, das [n.] (German): The proper German word for Gaiters. For a definition, see Gaiters.
Schulterklappe, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Shoulder Strap. For a definition, see Shoulder Strap.
Schulterstücke, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Shoulder Board. For a definition, see Shoulder Board.
Schwarze Feldanzug, der [m.] (German): Literaly "black field uniform" in German, it is used to descibe the Panzer Uniform. For a definition, see Panzer Uniform.
SS (Schutzstaffel), die [f.] (German):
Shoulder Board:
Shoulder Cord:
Shoulder Strap:
Sleeve Eagle:
Smock:
Sommeranzug, der [m.] (German): The proper German term for Summer Uniform. For a definition, see Summer Uniform.
Sommerhosen, die [f.] (German): The proper German term for Summer Trousers. For a definition, see Summer Trousers.
Sommermütze, die [f.] (German): The proper German term for Summer Cap. For a definition, see Summer Cap.
Sommerrock, der [m.] (German): The proper German term for Summer Jacket. For a definition, see Summer Jacket.
Soutache:
Stern, der [m.] (German): Literaly "star" in German, it is used to descibe Pip for ranking on insignia. For a definition, see Pip.
Stiefel, die [pl.] (German): The proper German word for Boots. For a definition, see Boots.
Stiefelhosen, die [f.] (German):
Summer Cap:
Summer Jacket:
Summer Trousers:
Summer Uniform:

T
Tarnung, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Camouflage.
Tarnjacke, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Camouflage Jacket.
Tie:
Tropical Uniform:
Trousers:
Tuchrock, der [m.] (German):
Tunic: In uniform terminology, is what speakers of British-English call a military hip or thigh length jacket with skirts reaching at least to the wrists and having four pockets. In other words, what Americans call a "Service Coat" and the Germans call a "Field Blouse" (Feldbluse). A waist length jacket with two chest pockets is a "Blouse", even in Britain. There is no such thing as a "Battle Dress Tunic" in any language. Britons wear a "tunic" when wearing the "Service Dress Uniform", but they wear a "blouse" when wearing the "Battle Dress Uniform".

U
Übermantel, der [m.] (German):
Umhang, der [m.] (German): The proper German word for Cloak or Cape. For a definition, see Cape.
Uniform (military):
Uniform, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Uniform. For a definition, see Uniform.
Universal Field Cap:
Universal Flying Cap:
Unteroffizier, der [m.] (German): The proper German word for Non-commissioned Officer (NCO). For a definition, see Non-commissioned Officer (NCO) Ranks.

V

W
Waffenfarbe, die [f.] (German):
Waffenrock, der [m.] (German):
Wehrmacht, die [f.] (German): The proper German term for Armed Forces.
Wettermantel, der [m.] (German): Literaly "weather coat" in German, it is used to descibe Rain Coat. For a definition, see Rain Coat.
Windbluse, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Wind Blouse. For a definition, see Wind Blouse.
Windjacke, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Wind Jacket. For a definition, see Wind Jacket.
Wind Blouse:
Wind Jacket:
Woven Insignia:

X

Y

Z
Zeltbahn, die [f.] (German):

CLOTH, FABRIC, and TEXTILE TERMINOLOGY (both English and German)

Easy Search
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

B
Back Stitch:
Bartack: Is a series of hand or machine made stitches used for reinforcing areas of stress on a garment, such as pocket openings, bottom of a fly opening or buttonholes. It consists of a series of close-set zig-zag stitches (machine) or whip-stitches (hand), usually 1/16"-1/8" in width and 1/4"-3/8" in length.
Basket Weave: Is a variation of the plain weave in which two or more warp and weft threads are woven side by side to
resemble a "basket" look. Fabrics have a loose construction and a flat appearance. Process of weaving yarns back and forth resulting in a two-tone appearance. [3]

Baumwolle, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Clothes, Clothing or Garment.
Bekleidung, die [f.] [pl.] (German): The proper German word for Cotton. For a definition, see Cotton / Cotton Fabric.
Bias: Is a direction of a piece of woven fabric, usually referred to simply as "the bias" or "the cross-grain", is at 45 degrees to its warp and weft threads. Every piece of woven fabric has two biases, perpendicular to each other. Non-woven fabrics such as felt or interfacing do not have a bias. Piping on uniforms and caps and Lampassen on trousers are made on the bias of cloth. This is because woven cloth bends without deforming when cut on a bias.
Bottle-green (Color):
Bolt:
Bullion:
Button:

C
Cavalry Twill Fabric:
Collar:
Cord:
Cord, der [m.] (German):
Cotton / Cotton Fabric:
Cotton Duck Fabric: Is a heavy, plain woven cotton fabric woven with two yarns together in the warp and a single yarn in the weft. Cotton duck can go by several names: "duck", "duck cloth" or "duck canvas" (commonly known as "canvas" outside of the textile industry).
Crimp: Wool has several qualities that distinguish it from hair or fur. For one, it is crimped which means the fiber's natural waviness and gives it an advantage over other textile fiber characteristics like flexibility, elasticity, resilience, and loft. "The crimp allows wool to be nature's most elastic fiber meaning that it can be stretched by as much as 30% and it will spring back once tension is released. This allows wool garments to move with the body which makes them comfortable to wear, but won't stretch out of shape. The crimp also makes wool the most flexible fiber. Wool will bend up to 20,000 times before it breaks. Cotton breaks after 3,200 bends, silk after 1,800 bends and rayon after 75 bends. A flexible fiber is more durable. When subjected to the abuses of everyday wear, it will bend rather than break. A flexible fiber is also stronger because it resists tearing. Tearing wool fabric is a lot like trying to tear a rubber band. The crimp in the wool holds each fiber apart fromm all the others, like curly hair, creating volume. A straight fiber, such as linen, takes up less space because the fibers lie close together, like straight hair. Because of this wool can be spun into bulky yarns that are lightweight and full of air, while a linen yarn of similar bulk would be dense and unbearably heavy. That's why so many blankets are made of wool. You can crush a handful of wool to reduce its volume, but when you open your hand, the wool will spring back to its original size. This is an example of resilience, one of wool's most important characteristics. Resilience is the reason carpets maintain a springy pile, smooth fabrics stay smooth and wrinkles will fall away from almost any wool garment, even one that has been squeezed into a suitcase for a week." [1]
Crown (Cap):

D
Denim Fabric: Is a rugged cotton twill cloth, in which the weft passes under two (twi- "double") or more warp fibers. This produces the familiar diagonal ribbing identifiable on the reverse of the fabric, which distinguishes denim from cotton duck.
Doeskin Wool:
Drill Fabric:
Drillich, der [m.] (German):

E
Earth-brown (Color):
Earth-gray (Color):
Earthtones (Color): Are neutral shades reminiscent of colors found in nature, such as deserts, mountains, and valleys. Many of these shades serve as a base of apparel, particularly in clothing (suits, etc.). Colors include tan brown,
sage, and charcoal. [3]
Embroidery: Is the method of decorating fabric or other materials with designs stitched in strands of thread or yarn using a needle. Embroidery is done by hand or by machine. Embroidery may also use other materials such as metal strips, pearls, beads, quills, and sequins. An enlisted embroidered SS sleve eagle is an example of machine embroidery. Officer's bullion embroidery is an example of embroidery done by hand.

Eyelette: Are small holes or perforations made individualy or in a series to allow for breathability. They are finished with either stitching or metal grommets. [3]
Eyelette Button Hole (Key-holed Button Hole):

F
Felted Fabric / Felting: (different from Felted wool)
Felted Wool:
Field-gray (Color): Is the traditional color of German Army uniforms. The field-gray wool used for uniforms at the beginning of WW2 had a pronounced blue-green tone. The color range of field-gray expanded as more dark-green, slate-gray, and even olive-brown shades came into use as the war progressed. However, the early war field-gray was never completely supplanted and examples can be found of early blue-green field gray being used for the very latest styles of uniforms produced in the ruins of the Third Reich.
Flat, Falling, Fall Collar:
Full Bust (Measurement):
Fulling: Is the most common finishing step for woolen fabrics. Its takes advantage of wool's felting property to shrink the fabric and tighten the weave, making the fabric stronger, thicker, denser and more compact. The greater the shrinkage, the stronger the fabric. Fulling reduces the width of most fabrics to 60 inches, common to the wool trade. [1]
Fur:

G
Gabardine Wool: Is a form of twill weave material which is a tough, tightly woven fabric used to make suits, trousers and other suiting garments. It is traditionally made of worsted wool, but may also be made of cotton, synthetic or mixed materials. Gabardine was invented in the late 19th century by Thomas Burberry and was named after "gaberdine", a long, loose overgarment tied at the waist. Many german uniforms of higher grade (like officer's uniforms worn indoors as opposed to in the field) were manufactured with woolen gabardine material
Garment Dyeing: Is a dyeing process that occurs after the garment is assembled. [3] This allows the apparel maker to respond quickly to market demand for color. It is the least common dying method. [1]
Gefleckt (German): The proper German word for Melange, Heathered or Flecked. For a definition, see Melange.
Gestrick, das [n.] die [pl.] (German): The proper German word for Knitted Fabric(s). For a definition, see Knitted Fabric / Knitting.
Gewebe, das [n.] (German): The proper German word for Woven Fabric. This word can also translate into Cloth, Fabric or Textile. For a definition, see Woven Fabric / Weaving.
Grading:
Grosgrain: Is a ribbon of closely woven silk or rayon fabric with narrow horizontal ribs.
Gusset: Is an inlaid piece of fabric, usually triangular, between arm and body of shirt. Allows ease of movement. [3]

H
Height (Measurement):
Hem / Hemming: Hemming a piece of cloth is folding up a cut edge, folding it up again, and then sews it down. The process completely encloses the cut edge in cloth, so that it cannot ravel. This edge is also called a "hem".
Herring-bone Twill (HBT) Fabric:
High Bust (Measurement):
Hips (Measurement):

I
Inseam (Measurement):
Interfacing:

J
Jacquard: Is a type of woven or knitted fabric, which is constructed on a special machine that uses needle selection which results in intricate, complex all-over designs. Single knit jacquards are commonly knit with two separate colored yarns that are knit together in a row. Double knit jacquards are knit with up to five separate colored yarns across a row. Double knits are generally much more intricate, more colorful and yet heavier (mostly used in long sleeve product). Woven jacquard fabrics include brocade, damask and tapestry. A pattern knit directly into the fabric during the manufacturing process. Typically, two or more colors are used. [3] Almost all german woven insignia (eagles, collar-tabs, cuff-titles, etc.) are manufactured with this method: the Jacquard weave.
Jersey / Jersey Knit: Is a single knit construction which has rows of vertical loops (knit stitches) on the face and rows of horizontal half-loops (purl stitches) on the back. Jersey can be any fiber content and can be knit flat or circular. Often used in short sleeve knit shirts. This fabric has a definite smooth side, the outside, and a textured side, the inside. [3]

K
Kämmling, der [m.] (German): The proper German word for Noil. For a definition, see Noil.
Knitted Fabric / Knitting:
Knopf, der [m.] (German): The proper German word for Button. For a definition, see Button.
Körperbindung, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Twill Weave. For a definition, see Twill Weave.

L
Lock Stitch:
Loden Wool:

M
Melange (Heathered or Flecked): A mix of different colors of yarns knit together to create a heathered effect. [3] German type-I and type-II apple-green jump smocks are prime examples of the use of melange fabric. In order to achieve the apple-green color, emerald-green and orange was heathered together.

N
Nap: Raised surface or pile of a fabric, such as wool, formed by distressing it. [3]
Noil: Is the short fiber left over from combing wool or spinning silk. Silk noil is also called "raw silk", although that is a misnomer. As noil is a relatively short fiber, fabric made from noil is weaker and considered less valuable.
Notions: Is an accessory in the sewing industry. The word is usually used in the plural: notions. Notions are sewn or glued onto garments and manufactured goods. Notions include all types of fasteners and novelties like buttons, zippers and beads.
Nylon / Nylon Fabric:

O

P
Package Dyeing (Yarn Dyeing):
Patch Pocket: Is a pocket attached to the outside of a garment. [3]
Patern / Paterning:
Pelz, der [m.] (German): The proper German word for Pelt or Fur. For a definition, see Fur.
Peak (Cap):
Piece Dyeing:
Piping (Basket weave):
Piping (Cording):
Placket: Is the part of a shirt or jacket where the garment fastens together. [3]
Plain Weave: Is the simplest, most common of three basic weaves (over one/under one interlacement). Provides a smooth surface for printing. The other basic weaves are satin and twill. (See Broadcloth, Chambray, and Poplin). [3]
Polyester / Polyester Fabric:
Poplin: Is a strong fabric in plain weave with crosswise ribs. The word's origin is french "papeline" from around 1710. Many of the outer gaments used by the germans (wind jackets, wind blouses, jump smocks, smocks, helmet covers, parkas) were manufactured with cotton, cotton blended with rayon or rayon poplin.
Profile (Cap): Is a height of a cap's crown. Low-profile is approximately 3.5". Regular profile is approximately 3.75". Pro-style is somewhere in-between the two. [3]

Q

R
Raw Edge: Is an unfinished edge of cloth.
Rayon / Rayon Fabric:
Reed-green (Color):
Reinforced Seating:
Reißwolle, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Recycled Wool, Re-used Wool or Shoddy Wool. For a definition, see Re-used Wool.
Re-used Wool:

S
Satin Weave:
Scaling:
Schilfgrün (German): The proper German word for Reed-green. For a definition, see Reed-green.
Schurwolle, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for newly manufactured wool.
Selvage Edge: In a woven fabric, the selvage (or selvedge) is the uncut edge of the fabric which is on the right- and left-hand edges as it comes out of the loom. As such it is 'finished' and will not fray because the weft threads double back on themselves. In knitted fabric, the term also refers to the unfinished but structurally sound edges. The word's origin is from the term "self-edge".
Seam-ripper:
Spun Rayon: For a definition, see Rayon / Rayon Fabric.
Stand and Fall Collar:

Standing, Stand-up, Stand Collar:
Stoff, der [m.] (German): This word translates into several words of similar meanings. These words are Cloth, Fabric, Material or Textile. For a definition, see Textile.
Stock Dyeing (Fiber Dyeing):
Stone-gray (Color):
Streichgarn, das [n.] (German): The proper German word for Woolen Yarn.

T
Textile: Is a flexible material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres often referred to as thread or yarn. Yarn is produced by spinning raw wool fibres, linen fibres, cotton fibres, or other material on a spinning wheel to produce long strands. Textiles are formed by weaving, knitting, crocheting, knotting, or pressing fibres together (felt). The words fabric and cloth are used in textile assembly trades (such as tailoring and dressmaking) as synonyms for textile. However, there are subtle differences in these terms. "Textile" refers to any material made of interlacing fibres. "Fabric" refers to any material made through weaving, knitting, crocheting, or bonding. "Cloth" refers to a finished piece of fabric.
Thread Eyes (Award Loops):
Top Dyeing:
Top Stitch:
Torqued: Is natural twisting that occurs when a circular knit fabric is in a relaxed state. A circular knit is knit in a spiral motion and therefore "straight" stripes want to twist. This phenomenon usually occurs in poor quality jacquard knits and is minimized by compacting and the use of stabilizing resins. [3]
Tricot / Tricot Fabric: Is a knitted fabric. More precisely, a plain warp-knit fabric that can be created with an array of fibres and fibre blends. It is not unusual for various types of tricot to be manufactured with the use of cotton, wool, silk, rayon, or nylon, or any combination of fibres. Because the pattern for tricot fabric is a close-knit design with fibres running lengthwise while employing an interlooped yarn pattern, the texture of tricot is a little different from some other types of material. One side will feature fine ribs running in a lengthwise pattern, while the other side will feature ribs that run in a crosswise direction. The finished look of tricot is that of a sturdy yet soft material that can be ideal for a number of applications.
Tricotine / Tricotine Fabric: Not to be confused with tricot, tricotine is a high-quality, woven worsted fabric with a 63 degree, double twill on the face of the cloth. Belongs to the same family as gabardine, whipcord, covert and cavalry twill. Various weights are used for men's and women's clothing. [3] Many german uniforms of higher grade (like officer's uniforms worn indoors as opposed to in the field) were manufactured with woolen tricot material
Trikot, der [m.] (German): The proper German word for Tricotine. The germans used the french word Tricot to describe a double-faced twill weave fabric that was ment to look like the knitted Tricot fabric. The english word for "Trikot" woven fabric is "Tricotine", not "Tricot" which is a knitted fabric. This can be very confusing. For a definition, see Tricotine / Tricotine Fabric.
Tuch, das [n.] (German): This word has one of two meanings depending on the context of which it is used. One meaning is simply Cloth. The other is Woven Fabric. For a definition of the later, see Woven Fabric / Weaving.
Twill Tape: Is narrow herringbone twill weave tape used as reinforcement at the stress areas - neck, shoulders,
pockets - of a garment. It is also used as a design element, often inside plackets. [3]

Twill Weave: Is one of the three basic weaves (the others are plain and satin). It is characterized by a diagonal rib (twill)
generally running upward from left to right (right hand twill). Left hand twill (traditional denim weave) has the diagonal rib running upward from right to left. Twill weaves are used to produce a strong, durable firm fabric. A fabric characterized by micro diagonal ribs producing a soft, smooth finish. [3]

U

V
Visor (Cap):
Vulcanized Fiber: Is a leatherlike material made by compressing layers of paper (celulose) or cloth. Most visors on the german peaked cap (Schirmmütze) are made with vulcanized fiber. To the average person, vulcanized fiber can easilly be confused with plastic.
Vulkanfiber, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Vulcanized Fiber. For a definition, see Vulcanized Fiber.

W
Waist / Waistline (Measurement):
Warp: In weaving, the warp is the set of lengthwise yarns through which the weft is woven. Each individual warp thread in a fabric is called a warp end. Warp means "that which is thrown across" (Old English wearp, from weorpan, to throw, cf. German werfen, Dutch werpen). When weaving with a loom, the warp yarns are fully attached before weaving begins.
Weft: In weaving, weft or woof is the yarn which is drawn under and over parallel warp yarns to create a fabric. In North America, the weft is sometimes referred to as the "fill" or the "filling yarn". The weft is threaded through the warp using a shuttle.
Whip Stitch:
Wool / Wool Fabric:
Wolle, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Wool. For a definition, see Wool / Wool Fabric.
Wool / Wool Fabric:
Woven Fabric / Weaving: is the textile art in which two distinct sets of yarns or threads, called the warp and the filling or weft (weft (woof) is an old English word meaning "that which is woven"), are interlaced with each other to form a fabric or cloth. The warp threads run lengthways of the piece of cloth, and the weft runs across from side to side. Woven cloth is woven on a loom, a device for holding the warp threads in place while the filling threads are woven through them. The manner in which the warp and filling threads interlace with each other is known as the weave. The three basic weaves are plain weave, satin weave, and twill, and the majority of woven products are created with one of these weaves. Woven cloth only stretches in the bias directions (between the warp and weft directions), unless the threads are elastic. Woven cloth usually frays at the edges, unless measures are taken to counter this, such as the use of pinking shears or "hemming". Most cloth in use is woven.

X

Y
Yardage:

Z
Zellwolle, die [f.] (German): The proper German word for Spun Rayon or Rayon Staple. For a definition, see Rayon / Rayon Fabric.
Zig-zag Stitch:

Bibliography LIST IS INCOMPLETE
Many of the terms above were defined directly from these sources. These books listed here are an excellent source for better understanding german uniforms. Understanding the textile industry better arms you from getting scamed into buying a fake original or a poorly constructed reproduction.

[1] Parker, Julie. All About Wool: A Fabric Dictionary & Swatchbook.
        Seattle, WA: Rain City Publishing, 1998.

[2] Parker, Julie. All About Cotton: A Fabric Dictionary & Swatchbook.
        Seattle, WA: Rain City Publishing, 1995.

[3] Quality Logo Products: Promotional Items Glossary.
        (http://www.qualitylogoproducts.com/Glossary-T.htm).

[4] Merriam-Webster Online.
        (http://www.merriam-webster.com).

[5] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, English.
        (http://en.wikipedia.org).


BARGAIN BUNKER
(updated January 19, 2017)
Check out our latest sales and good deals.
Lost Battalions' M.43 Tunic details
Click on the image above for an idea of how much detail we put into our clothing.
Proper fit for a WW2 German fieldblouseClick on the image above to read our article about proper German Field Blouse length.
Click here to visit our
GALLERY PAGE


Click on the picture above to find out who we are.


Click on the picture above to see why we're the best!
a
©1995-2016 Lost Batallions
Please just ASK before using anything from this website
Page updated: Wednesday, April 13, 2016 | 9:28:56 PM
a
Website design by Sturmkatze Produktions AG